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MCOL in the News

11 December 2015
Adult Literacy in the News Commission in the News

Check out what we’ve been up to in 2015!

DSCN2249Recently, Philadelphia got a big thumbs up for its KEYSPOT program. The city won the first-ever Leader in Digital Inclusion Award from the National League of Cities and Next Century Cities in partnership with Google Fiber (other winners include Austin, Texas, and Washington, D.C., for its newly renovated Mobile Tech Lab). >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249Philadelphia offers its first free online interactive adult-education program, bringing innovation to this tough problem. Five years ago, more than half a million adults in Philadelphia lacked basic literacy and work skills, imperiling their ability to land jobs and climb out of poverty, the Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board reported. Yet at the same time, hundreds of literacy providers operated scattershot programs all over the city, albeit with few resources, fewer notable metrics, and even less oversight. >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249Five years ago, more than half a million adults in Philadelphia lacked basic literacy and work skills, imperiling their ability to land jobs and climb out of poverty, the Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board reported. Yet at the same time, hundreds of literacy providers operated scattershot programs all over the city, albeit with few resources, fewer notable metrics, and even less oversight.  >>>Read more.

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DSCN2249Five years ago, more than half a million adults in Philadelphia lacked basic literacy and work skills, imperiling their ability to land jobs and climb out of poverty, the Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board reported. Yet at the same time, hundreds of literacy providers operated scattershot programs all over the city, albeit with few resources, fewer notable metrics, and even less oversight.  >>>Read more.

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DSCN2249Of America’s largest metropolitan areas, the City of Brotherly Love ranks near the top in a less than ideal way, claiming one of the highest rates of functional illiteracy in the country. An estimated half a million adult residents—or nearly one-third of the population—operate below basic education levels. And with 27 percent of the city’s population living in poverty, an astonishing number of individuals lack the basic skills necessary to advance out of their circumstances, whether within postsecondary programs or into gainful employment.  >>>Read more.

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DSCN2249Public schools are a perpetual worry for Philadelphia, and scant attention is often paid to another weighty educational problem: adults who struggle to read.

But nearly half of all adults in the city – more than half a million men and women – lack the basic skills necessary to qualify for postsecondary training or to hold jobs that permit them to support a family. Many function below eighth-grade levels. >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249In 2011, Mayor Michael Nutter charged the Commission on Literacy to help the estimated 550,000 adults in the city who were functioning below basic adult education levels. Right now, over 80 percent of job seekers that are tested in PA CareerLink® employment centers are at 5th-8th grade levels of reading, writing, and math. >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249The Mayor’s Commission on Literacy has brought literacy and ESL providers together with workforce development professionals and launched myPLACE℠ campuses, which are both virtual and brick-and-mortar “one-stop shops” for adult education and career preparation. >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249Getting people out of poverty and providing families with financial stability isn’t as simple as job creation or even workforce training. >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249Philly Tech Week is a time to celebrate technology, including the incredible innovations and advances we are making as a city and a country. This week, attendees will hear from some of our great city’s most successful leaders in technology, as well as exciting new startup entrepreneurs.  >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Hundreds of local young people gathered today on the campus of Temple University, in North Philadelphia, hoping to link up with companies or organizations offering summer jobs or volunteer opportunities.  >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249PASkills matter. In the past year, a remarkable convergence of data, analysis, and policy informed us of just how much they matter to individuals, their families and communities, and to the economy overall. This report presents a vision for making adult skill development—upskilling—more prevalent, efficient, effective, and convenient. This vision
rests on an understanding that foundation skills—the combination of literacy, numeracy, and English language, as well as employability skills required for participation in modern workplaces and contemporary life—are a shared responsibility of, and value and benefit to, the entire community.  >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249The phone rings, and a hesitant voice says, “I need to get my GED. I need a class.” The phone rings all day long, and 350-400 times a month in the offices of The Mayor’s Commission on Literacy in Philadelphia. Decades of off-shoring manufacturing have left us with a shrinking middle class and a devastated working class. Americans whose parents and grandparents supported their families with well-paying jobs have been stranded with few or no job prospects. At the same time, the education levels expected for entry-level jobs have risen ever higher. Employers now expect job applicants to have not just a high school diploma, but at least a couple of years of college or a post-secondary certificate.  >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249An estimated one in two adults in Philadelphia are not able to read, write, do mathematics, or use technology at levels expected by employers for entry-level 21st-century jobs (Help Wanted: Knowledge Workers Needed, Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board, June, 2009). Philadelphia has among the highest unemployment and poverty rates, and lowest workforce participation rates among the nation’s largest cities (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014 data). The city’s crime rates have fallen significantly, but the city still spends more on public safety than on any other category of expenditure.  >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249What Happened? Philadelphia has launched an adult education system to equip the city’s adult workforce with the professional skills required to fill roles in growing industries. The technology-based initiative aims to reduce unemployment, spur economic growth, and enable fiscal self-sufficiency for residents.  >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249The READ! by 4th Campaign is an ambitious attempt to help increase literacy rates among young Philadelphia students and thereby improve education in the city. With the May 19 mayoral primary fast approaching, the Notebook asked each of the announced candidates—Democrats Lynne Abraham, Nelson Diaz, Doug Oliver, Milton Street, and Anthony Hardy Williams—to say, in 300 words or less, how they plan to support this early literacy campaign’s efforts, and what obstacles they thought might hinder its success. Here is what they had to say. The comments of Diaz and Street were edited for length.   >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249Imagine yourself trying to find a job when you don’t have a high school diploma. You go to a local community center and ask about the GED classes they offer, but you are too late – the next opening isn’t for months. >>>Read more.
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DSCN2249“You can’t improve the public schools until you deal with where these kids come from. I can’t crush poverty by focusing on the kids.”  >>>Read more.

 

 

 

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